Victoria Sponge cake.

How to make a Victoria Sponge Cake

Victoria Sponge cake on a glass cake stand.

A Victoria Sponge Cake is one of the easiest cakes to make. I love baking it because I can have a cake that’s baked and ready to eat within an hour. Great for last minute tea time dessert, when you don’t want to go to a lot of trouble, but still give your family something of a treat to eat after they’ve eaten all their greens.

You only need 4 basic ingredients to make a Victoria Sponge Cake. Butter, Sugar, Eggs and Flour. Vanilla Extract is added once all your ingredients are beaten together. Grease and line the loose bottomed cake tins with baking parchment on the bottom.

When the cake batter is well mixed, spread the batter evenly between the two cake tins.

It only takes 20 mins to bake and even with cooling time, you can have a freshly baked cake within an hour. I love it.

 

victoria sponge cakes on a cooling rack

Flatten the dome, rather than slice it off.

Both cakes will have risen slightly, so rather than cut one of the domes off, turn one over on the cooling rack and flatten it just a little. The two bases will be sandwiched together with jam.

Keep it simple with your favourite jam filling.

No need for fancy buttercream, icings or fillings, sandwich both cakes together with your favourite preserve and dust with a light coating of caster sugar.

An alternative filling to have would be Homemade Lemon curd. 

Use this recipe as a basis for all the bakes that you make from now on, and you will soon build a repertoire of cake recipes.

You may like to bake these other easy cake recipes

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Victoria Sponge cake.
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

How to make a Victoria Sponge Cake

A very easy Victoria Sponge Cake. Filled with Raspberry or Strawberry Jam. Topped with a dusting of Caster sugar.
Prep Time18 hrs 11 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Course: cake
Cuisine: British
Servings: 8 - 10
Author: Lynn Hill

Ingredients

  • 225 g butter softened
  • 225 g white caster sugar
  • 4 medium eggs
  • 225 g self raising flour
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon milk optional
  • Raspberry or strawberry jam
  • Caster sugar for dusting

Instructions

  • Grease and line the base of two 19cm/7.5ins loose bottomed cake tins.
  • Preheat the oven to 180 deg fan assisted.
  • Using an electric mixer. Beat together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  • Gradually add the eggs, one at a time, adding a little flour between each one. This will help prevent curdling. Mix together until well combined.
  • Add the vanilla extract and the remaining flour. Mix until well combined.
  • Your batter should be of a dropping consistency. (drop off your spatular easily) If not, add the milk and mix until well combined.
  • Pour the cake batter evenly into the two cakes tins. Use scales to ensure you have an equal amount in each tin, or this will affect your baking times.
  • Bake in the centre of the oven for 20 mins. Or until baked. Testing the centre of each cake with a skewer until it comes out clean.
  • Leave in the tins for 5 - 10 mins to cool a little, before turning out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  • Turn one of the cakes upside down to flatten the dome.
  • When cooled completely place the flattened domed cake on a cake stand with it's base facing upwards. Spread a layer of Raspberry or Strawberry jam. Place the second layer on top.
  • Dust with a light coating a caster sugar.

Notes

This cake will keep for a few days in an airtight container. But is best eaten on the day it's made.
If you keep it in the fridge, the sponge will harden due to it being made with butter. Bring to room temperature before serving.

6 Comments

  1. Janet Constance Bellamy Woodward

    Need to test this one for yourself, please. Base line and grease only the bottom of the tin. Leave the sides bare. Level the batter in the tin. Slight indentation only. Apparently, this should result in an almost flat top on baking. Vic sponges are always a good test of things…. It was explained to me as to why….but I am not techie at this hour on a Tuesday morning. Happy Chinese New year…

    • Thanks for the tip Janet. Worth me trying next time. For tins like loose bottom shallow ones, I usually grease the base and sides and place a circle of parchment on the base, as per my images. When baking deeper cakes, I will always line the sides with baking parchment too. It seems to help prevent over baking of the sides.

  2. Janet Constance Bellamy Woodward

    It helps if I wear my glasses…tin size and greasing etc is on the sheet. I have a nosy kitten on my lap and she wants to pat the keys… Sorry!!!

  3. Janet Constance Bellamy Woodward

    Need to grease lightly and base line with a circle of greaseproof paper.

    No size of tin stated. Usually when cake is done, it shrinks a little from the edges. Happy baking…

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